Charles C.

Mr. Charles C. suffered from an olfactory hallucination.

Mr. Charles C. remembers very unpleasant hallucinations of smell and taste.

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Corine Mouton-Dorey

Corine Mouton-Dorey focuses her research on patient agency and accountability. Her PhD work on biomedical ethics identified the importance of the patients’voices in medical practice for better care, trust and justice in health. She has a practical experience with patients both as a cardiologist and as a qualitative researcher. She supports  the french-speaking part of the DIPEx project and work on the possibilities to enrich DIPEx process and outcomes with digital technology.

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Mr. Charles C. suffered from an olfactory hallucination.

“And there, it was a more difficult thing. I was in a coma for four days and I was losing weight and it was difficult to feed me. And I was on morphine quite heavily. And that gave me all sorts of problems: one, the most severe, was the sense of smell and of taste, which I reckon was augmented a hundred times. So, one little grain of sugar in water was impossible to drink. Smells, I could / I felt I could smell like a wolf smells. I could / I knew what was happening around me, not from a directional point of view, but that was very difficult. And, the only problem I had there then, was getting over to the people who were dealing with me: that I couldn’t eat these things or drink these things, because the taste was too strong. And each time I would take a glass of even water, or orange juice, I would be vomiting, because of the strength of the taste. That was something that I found in, you know. It was I guess about a day and a half before I really managed to convince someone that I wasn’t exaggerating. And we think that the reason was the morphine, but it may not have been. It may have been swollen mouth or whatever.”

Experiences in the intensive care unit

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Credits

Corine Mouton-Dorey

Corine Mouton-Dorey focuses her research on patient agency and accountability. Her PhD work on biomedical ethics identified the importance of the patients’voices in medical practice for better care, trust and justice in health. She has a practical experience with patients both as a cardiologist and as a qualitative researcher. She supports  the french-speaking part of the DIPEx project and work on the possibilities to enrich DIPEx process and outcomes with digital technology.

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